NYSQBS Home Page
Qualifications Based Selection
NYSQBS Council
14 N. Marvine Ave.
Auburn, NY 13021
Sponsors
ACECNY NYSSPE NYSCLA NYSAPLS AIA APWA AWWA
What is Qualifications Based Selection?

Qualifications Based Selection (QBS) is a process for the selection of design professionals. It is a negotiated procurement process for selection based on qualifications and competence in relation to the work to be performed.

Quality begins with qualifications-based selection. The New York State QBS Council can help you gain a better understanding of the process of selecting an engineer or architect. From the pre-proposal stage through proposals and interviews, we can help you streamline and improve each step. The end result, a project team that will deliver you the project you expect.

Selection Process
Step 1
Establish evaluation criteria and select the best qualified firm.
Establish Evaluation Criteria
Solicit Statements of Qualifications
Develop a Short List of Firms
Interview and Rank the Firms
Step 2
Jointly define scope and contract terms taking advantage of the experience of the selected firm.
Selected Firm Assists in Defining Scope of Work
Establish Contract Terms Work With the Next Firm on the Short List
Agreement
Yes               No
Step 3
Retain the firm on the basis of an acceptable proposal.
Ask for Fee Proposal
Agreement
Yes               No
Retain the Selected Firm
Real World
Memo from Kaye Henderson, Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation from 1987-1990.

"As Secretary, I inherited a system of selecting design professionals on the basis of competitive bidding. The results were uniformly negative. Price-based selections for design services donít work. It didnít work for the public, the agency administrators, contract managers or even office holders."
Just the Faqs
Q. How does QBS benefit the community?
A. QBS results in projects with the best design solutions to meet the needs of the project, emphasizing public health, safety and quality of life.
Quotables
Ö use of "low bid" procedure has frequently resulted in insufficient funds allocated to a project to adequately verify the accuracy of design and to thoroughly check plans before construction Ö
U.S. House of Representatives Report 98-621